Recording drums with a Tascam US-16x08 interface & Ardour 6.9

I’m very green behind the ears at this and looking for advice on trying to hook up a Tascam US-16x08 interface with my Ardour 6.9. I’m also using an ubuntu 20.04.3 OS. I’m not sure what sound server API’s I’ll need, and anything else that is required for that matter. …really appreciate any tips at all, thx a lot…

That device needs a special program to access the internal mixer on Linux. I don’t own the device, so I have not installed it, but here it is:

Looks like a user provided some additional info on the process here (but I would start with the GitHub page):

Regarding what sound server to use, I would recommend just sticking with ALSA in the Ardour setup screen, which is the simplest method.

I use it without the special driver and it works

It’s not a special driver (I mean the tascam-gtk stuff) but rather an application that allows getting a much better access to the tascam parameters (cutoff frequencies, gains, balance, usb out, output routing…) than alsamixer.
I also own a tascam us16x08 and it works great!

Thank you for your time, everyone. I’ll give it a shot and get back to you!
Cheers, sound-mates!
Greetings from Madrid

Hello, does anyone know what the special application is, what’s its name??.. in regards to better Tascam parameters and performance? Thanks

En lunes, 14 de marzo de 2022, 08:29:35 CET, remyzerems via Ardour Forum <no-reply@ardour.org> escribió:  

remyzerems
March 14 |

It’s not a special driver (I mean the tascam-gtk stuff) but rather an application that allows getting a much better access to the tascam parameters (cutoff frequencies, gains, balance, usb out, output routing…) than alsamixer.
I also own a tascam us16x08 and it works great!

Visit Topic or reply to this email to respond.

To unsubscribe from these emails, click here.

“tascam-gtk”, the first link in my initial reply takes you to the program’s webpage

Hello Gunther,
Thx for getting back to me on such an obvious answer. I’ve been looking at the page and trying to figure it out all week, the truth is that I don’t know what steps to take. There are 21 listings with files starting with “autom4te.cache” and ending with “screenshot.png”. Do you happen to know what the first step I should take is? Sorry, this is all new to me. Green, green, green!
I know how to copy commands and paste into my terminal, is that what I need to do here with all 21 things on the list?
Once again, thanks tons for the patience!
En lunes, 21 de marzo de 2022, 15:43:23 CET, GuntherT via Ardour Forum no-reply@ardour.org escribió:

GuntherT
March 21 |

“tascam-gtk”, the first link in my initial reply takes you to the program’s webpage

Visit Topic or reply to this email to respond.

To unsubscribe from these emails, click here.

That page is the project page for the source code. The project does not appear to have any prebuilt binary packages, so you either have to learn how to compile the code for yourself (not horribly tricky, but lots of background knowledge to learn along the way), or look for a tascam-gtk package in your distribution repository. Or get another friend who runs the same release of Ubuntu to build it for you and give you the binary.

Most projects have a reasonably easy build process if you are comfortable navigating around the terminal (command line interface), and can get all the required development packages installed through your distribution package manager.

The second link in the post from GuntherT has instructions for how to do that, and the bottom post at that forum has a list of the packages you need to install first to get the instructions to work successfully. It may be a little intimidating at first, so finding a friend who is comfortable working in Ubuntu to help you over any problems you find would be helpful.

Thanks for the tips, Chris, I really appreciate it.

En lunes, 21 de marzo de 2022, 17:29:00 CET, Chris via Ardour Forum <no-reply@ardour.org> escribió:  

Chris ccaudle
March 21 |

DEREK_CARTER_STRAND:
There are 21 listings with files starting with “autom4te.cache” and ending with “screenshot.png”.

That page is the project page for the source code. The project does not appear to have any prebuilt binary packages, so you either have to learn how to compile the code for yourself (not horribly tricky, but lots of background knowledge to learn along the way), or look for a tascam-gtk package in your distribution repository. Or get another friend who runs the same release of Ubuntu to build it for you and give you the binary.

Most projects have a reasonably easy build process if you are comfortable navigating around the terminal (command line interface), and can get all the required development packages installed through your distribution package manager.

The second link in the post from GuntherT has instructions for how to do that, and the bottom post at that forum has a list of the packages you need to install first to get the instructions to work successfully. It may be a little intimidating at first, so finding a friend who is comfortable working in Ubuntu to help you over any problems you find would be helpful.

Visit Topic or reply to this email to respond.

To unsubscribe from these emails, click here.

No words are better suited for scaring the shxx out of me than “it may seem a little intimidating at first” :wink:
(Sorry, no helpful posting, I admit)

No doubt at all about that
En martes, 22 de marzo de 2022, 06:40:41 CET, Claus Rogge via Ardour Forum no-reply@ardour.org escribió:

Claus Rogge
March 22 |

No words are better suited for scaring the shxx out of me than “it may seem a little intimidating at first”
(Sorry, no helpful posting, I admit)

Visit Topic or reply to this email to respond.

To unsubscribe from these emails, click here.

Per the program’s author:

The repos tascam-gtk and tascam.lv2 are intent to be compiled on your own device, to ensure proper operation. No coding expirience is required, just clone them and execute .configure, make and make install.

Another user pointed out in the same thread:

You can install tascam-gtk as an executable binary with GNU Guix on all GNU/Linux systems.

Yes, that is common to a lot of linux programs.
But it doesn’t seem like you have done that before. Do you have autoconf, gcc, make, etc. installed on your system already? Do you have the development packages for libxml, libxml2, libasound, liblo already installed? The second link from GuntherT does point out to run .configure, make, make install, but additionally points out that you need to run make install with sudo (did you realize already that installing to system locations would require sudo, or is that new for you?), as well as answered a question in a post about the configure step failing because required development packages were not installed yet, and how to get the required additional packages installed.

So yes, “.configure, make and make install” but there are several small yet important details which are needed for that to work successfully.

1 Like

Hello!
Thanks for your time, guys!
First, Chris, I’ve probably unknowingly COMPILED things before, but I’ve certainly never CLONED before…(baby steps here, but gonna learn!)…How do I check if I have: AUTOCONF, GCC, MAKE, ETC.? Check out my installed apps? Well, I have and they don’t come up, so should I go download them from the internet? Also, the development packages you mention: LIBXML, LIBXML2, LIBASOUND, LIBLO, they’re not installed in my system. However, I AM a SUDO user on my terminal, yes.
Second, Gunther,Should I download the v1.3.0 GNU Guix?

Thx for the patience and interest, gentlemen!Heads up, here we go!

En martes, 22 de marzo de 2022, 19:19:31 CET, Chris via Ardour Forum <no-reply@ardour.org> escribió:  

Chris ccaudle
March 22 |

GuntherT:
execute .configure, make and make install

Yes, that is common to a lot of linux programs.
But it doesn’t seem like you have done that before. Do you have autoconf, gcc, make, etc. installed on your system already? Do you have the development packages for libxml, libxml2, libasound, liblo already installed? The second link from GuntherT does point out to run .configure, make, make install, but additionally points out that you need to run make install with sudo (did you realize already that installing to system locations would require sudo, or is that new for you?), as well as answered a question in a post about the configure step failing because required development packages were not installed yet, and how to get the required additional packages installed.

So yes, “.configure, make and make install” but there are several small yet important details which are needed for that to work successfully.

Visit Topic or reply to this email to respond.

To unsubscribe from these emails, click here.

Great clarification, I didn’t know how to expand on the author’s instructions and was betting you’d jump in with some extra details.

Cloning is a git operation that makes a copy of the source code on your machine. You really only need to do that if you want to keep up with frequent changes, but I suspect that a mature project supporting an old device will rarely if ever change, so you can just download a zip file from the pull-down box labeled “Code” on the project web page, and then unzip the source code into a convenient directory on your computer.

That varies somewhat by linux distribution, and I am not very familiar with Ubuntu. But yes, check your installed apps using whatever tool is most convenient for that on Ubuntu.
Most linux distributions will install gcc and make by default, if not then install those first.
According to the link in the earlier post these are the libraries needed:
libxml++
libxml2
libasound2
liblo

Look for the variants of those packages with “-dev” at the end of the name and install, after those are installed you should be able change directory to into the directory where you unzipped the source code for the Tascam tool (in a terminal), run “./configure” from the command line, run “make” from the command line, and at that point if there are no errors the application should be built. The final step of running “sudo make install” copies the application into your system directories so you can use it easily. You can usually run an application without that install step if you want to make sure it works. In this case the application name is tascamgtk (no - character in the file name), so from that directory where you ran make run “./tascamgtk” and it should start the application so you can verify it works like you need.

1 Like

On Ubuntu / Linux distros, those tools are dependencies of the build-essential meta-package. So, run

$ sudo apt install build-essential
1 Like

Chris, Gunther and tseaver,
I think(!) I was successful installing:…THANKS TONS GUYS!!

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!

En miércoles, 23 de marzo de 2022, 03:59:26 CET, tseaver via Ardour Forum <no-reply@ardour.org> escribió:  

tseaver
March 23 |

DEREK_CARTER_STRAND:
How do I check if I have: AUTOCONF, GCC, MAKE, ETC.?

On Ubuntu / Linux distros, those tools are dependencies of the build-essential meta-package. So, run
$ sudo apt install build-essential

Visit Topic or reply to this email to respond.

To unsubscribe from these emails, click here.