Post fader plugins

What would be the reason most people use plugins on the post fader on the mixer. When I mix I always put plugins before the fader icon on the mixer even when doing sends to a bus etc. I’m wondering if certain plugins I use should fo after the fader but I’m not sure why I would do that. As increasing the fader volume would increase or decrease the sound going into the plugin

Because some plugins sound different depending on gain?
Reverb, compression, for examples.
I’m not saying it should be done, but that is a use case.

You try to bring down a channel, and have a reverb on it for instance. You lower the fader:

  1. Pre-Fader
    The volume of the channel and reverb decrease, but the reverb decreases unnaturally quick, any existing tails currently being heard are reduced as well.

  2. Post Fader
    The volume of the channel and reverb decrease but the reverb tails currently heard continue on to tail off naturally, and any new reverb tails created are created at the lower volume, resulting in a more natural sounding fade.

This of course assumes the reverb is on the track. If it is a send to a reverb on a bus:

  1. Pre-Fader
    The volume of the track is reduced, but the reverb will continue on resulting in a 100% wet signal when the fader of the track is down all the way

  2. Post-Fader
    The volume of the track is reduced as and similar to the post fader above, the tails of the reverb continue on to reverb out naturally, any new trails are created at a more natural volume, again resulting in a more natural sounding fade out as the reverb naturally is reduced.

Just one example. In general you should probably look at Dynamics processing and EQ pre fader, and time based modulation effects post fader. As mentioned above, the sound changes depending on routing.

 Seablade
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To be clear, you are referring to what happens during automation or manual fader riding/printing, right? In a static mix (or simple audio capture with subsequent added reverb), moving the fader before playback or export will not make anything sound more unnatural.

That said, I am definitely a convert to 100% wet reverb busses and have long since rejected the dry/wet ratio knobs in plugins…

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I feel like noting that there are excellent aesthetic reasons for 100% wet reverb, and I’m glad to see people end up there no matter what the reason is :slight_smile:

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To be clear, you are referring to what happens during automation or manual fader riding/printing, right? In a static mix (or simple audio capture with subsequent added reverb), moving the fader before playback or export will not make anything sound more unnatural.

So for clarity, yes my previous post was talking about when actually mixing, not when dealing with a static mix, which is why I mentioned the movement of the fader.

  Seablade